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Monday, February 29, 2016

LFR 29th February 2016 Number 800





We are registered with the GUILD OF ONE-NAME STUDIES
www.one-name.org

Welcome to the Laws Family Register. 

Are you are a member

Yes, then your membership renewal is probably overdue  

No, then we need you, just as much as you need us.

Email for an application today

registrar@lawsfamilyregister.org.uk 
================================================================

If you are a LAWS or a LAWES or have these surnames in your family or perhaps it sounds like this but in fact is spelt differently, we would love to hear from you, we need to extend and expand our knowledge of the families we have already discovered,

  Come and join us, theres no better time than now.

The LAWS FAMILY REGISTER 
is 
here to serve our members


We reach out to all, regardless of Race, Colour, Creed or National Origin, with support for researching family and documenting cultural inhertance

============================================================. =======

If you are interested in anyone listed here, email us with the name, date and reference number, and we will happily do a look up, you might even get a whole tree! 

Family Events for today 29 February

All Leap Years
1848 - Birth: John LAWS (Coal Merchant) -91403, Chatteris CAM UK


                                                             Chatteris CAM UK

1868 - Death: William Henry LAWS-41286, Staines MDX UK

Staines MDX UK


1904 - Marriage: Charles LAWS (Gardener/Chauffeur) -4181 and Clarissa MITCHELL-51722,                  Dartford KEN UK
1908 - Birth: Kenneth Ralph LAWES (Australian Army) -32400, GLA UK
1920 - Birth: Gladys Victoria V LAWES-118692,
1920 - Birth: Oma E LAWES-37443,
1932 - Miscellaneous: Matthew LAWS (Fishmonger) -8839
1932 - Will  Dated: Edward LAWS-7760,
1936 - Death: George William Marshall LAWES-117444, Rishton LAN UK
1940 - Birth: Colin James LAWS (Lorry Driver)-44049, Romford ESS
1940 - Birth: Milton LAWS-119106,
1980 - Marriage: Ivan Roger WATKINS-54833 and Fern LAWS54831,
1980 - Death: Ida K LAWS (Unmarried) -56929, Franklin Co OH USA
1988 - Death: Dennis Leonard LAWS-117746, Norwich NFK UK

                                                  Elm Hill, Norwich NFK UK

2012 - Death: Roberta Mae LAWS-167497, London, Laurel Co. KY USA

MISC
1908 - Birth: Louina DIGNEN-124999, West Hartlepool DUR UK
1920 - Birth: Gladys May Victoria V PASK-167814, Witcham CAM UK

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You should join us today


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 Just send an email to 

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A Child of the Twenties

A suburban childhood of the Twenties 

seen from the Ninteen Nineties

by my late father John Robert Laws 1921-2008

HOLIDAYS
Walton on the Naze
There was always time to wander while parents were busy, mother shopping and father at work, and every corner of that little town stays clear in my mind. 

The crumbling cliffs were ideal for climbing and sliding down the dusty gullies if a piece of wood or tin could be found to sit on. Not so good for my white shorts which would acquire ochre coloured seat. Resulting in the admonition “You be careful now”. These cliffs were gradually being eroded by the North Sea and from time to time a part of a garden or even a house would go sliding down.

The sea defences were made stronger by extension of the hefty concrete promenade towards the south which is still holding up well. A walk along the beach beyond its end soon brought one to the more exclusive resort of Frinton, with its wide green lawns along the cliff tops which was usually visited once or twice during a holiday.

The northern part of Walton was lower without cliffs. The end of the High Street came along to the Front and the road and sea wall went on past a sometimes marshy patch of land beyond which the road went into a scattered little residential area and then dying out. 

Here the cliffs had risen again at the golf course where an old brick tower stands at the highest point. This provided a pleasant evening stroll which my father and I often took as far as the Naze. Felixstowe could be seen across the water as the land on our side ran back to the muddy tidal backwaters behind the coast.

These back waters ran right up behind the town and about twenty five acres of them were cut off from the tides with a dyke and made into a large lake with boats. This was a main attraction of the town to my father and virtually every morning that was fit, he and I would have a sailing dinghy out and sail the seven seas. 

His father had been a Sea Captain and I am told that only his mother’s insistence had prevented my father going to sea as a young man. As I grew older I was allowed a dinghy to myself and although I was never to become an addict I can understand how others do so. 

Being regulars and known to the boatman. We were allowed to sail on days when the wind was too strong to risk his dinghies in the hands of strangers and these were the days when it became quite fun.

                                The attraction of boats also ruled one of our regular outings during the holiday. We always went at least once to Brightlingsea, a slightly scruffy town famous only for boat yards and shrimp teas. It has always been an ocean racing centre but was not particularly prosperous in those days, there were wonderful boats on offer, at giveaway prices. We didn’t buy one. 

We just walked in the sun and looked, ate our shrimp tea and perhaps an ice cream, then trundled back to Walton. 

At Dedham however, another regular outing we could get a rowing boat on the Stour and glide through Constable’s countryside between the pollarded willows in the soft June sunshine. This was I fear, my father’s holiday, again just he and I went boating but then we were off in the car to Flatford for a strawberry tea amongst the wasps beside the bridge. It is all still there but somehow the rural peace is not the same since everyone spouted wheels.

All the countryside was more rural as a much smaller number of townsfolk invaded it every weekend. All the corn was cut with a binder of course and stood up in stooks in the field. Until it was cut East Anglia was a mass of red poppies, more beloved by the holidaymaker than the farmer. 

Farming had been depressed for some years and old cottages were being condemned as unfit for human habitation. It is sad to think it is only the war which brought back a sort of prosperity or at least a brief understanding of the need to grow our own food which now seems to be fading away again.

The thought of the corn takes me back to another little holiday I spent in the countryside. In truth mum and dad wanted a holiday on their own and Lottie took Mary and me for a week to her parents’ cottage in Bocking which really was rural. The water came from a long handled pump outside the back door and the loo was by the wash house in the garden. 

It was late summer but any need for light was met by oil lamps and candles. Little did I know that these were the normal facilities for most of rural England, and that for many places they would stay unchanged for another thirty years. 

It was harvest time  and the horse drawn binder went round and round the field throwing out sheaves and driving the ever present rabbits into the centre until they made a run for it  and someone got rabbit pie for dinner. 

Wages were meagre. Food was important, there was rhubarb under the apple tree and more cabbages than roses in the garden. There were plums in the garden too and home-made wine in the kitchen cupboard set into the wall alongside the black kitchen range.

There were no pavements through the village. There was after all virtually no traffic A few yards along the road on the other side from the cottage a path led down to the lazy river with its carpet of water lilies raising their bright yellow flowers above the dark green leaves, A few cows grazed the meadow beside the river avoiding the buttercups and leaving their squelchy traps for the unwary walker behind them. I didn’t wonder then, what it was like there in the winter time.

Another little holiday that was different turned up when my Uncle Albert and Aunt Louise were home on leave, and was going to spend a little while in a cottage in Cornwall. Their son Frank was a little younger than me, and I was invited to come along so that we could spend some time together. 

It was the only long train journey I had taken as a small boy, about ten years old I think, although the steam trains were always rushing past the bottom of our garden at home, I was unimpressed by the train journey. 

Once it had chugged out of Paddington the countryside rushed by, very different  from travelling in the car. Leaving our smoke and smuts behind us we dashed on through green fields until we came to the red soil of Devon,  with its sheep  smeared with the colour, then into the less lush Cornwall. 

The cottage was at Crantock on the North coast but not the bleak and barren part. It was tiny and ancient, just a few stone and thatch cottages and a church, but the memory of it, is of the peace of the village and the emptiness of the beach where we were able to swipe a golf ball along without fear of hitting someone. 

My uncle was reputed to be keen on photography and certainly had an enormous quarter plate camera which no doubt was capable of taking excellent photographs must have need a pantechnicon to carry it around. 

He was the up-market brother, whereas my dad was the up-to-date brother and had a little folding roll film camera just for holiday snaps.         

To be continued tomorrow 

I am planning to make this blog a weekly affair, as the time involved on a daily affair dominates other activites
Since I retired, I've gotten so very busy I'd never find time to work the long hours I did dashing all over Europe with either Cargo, Documents or VIP's 



The content provided on this site is not guaranteed to be error free - It is always advised that you consult original records.

Member of The Guild of One-Name Studies

"This organization recognizes the United Nations' International Decade for People of African Descent 2015-2024. We reach out to all regardless of race, color, creed or national origin with support for researching family and documenting cultural inheritance.”

With grateful thanks to Simon Knott for permission to reproduce his photographs on this site see :-http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/
================================================================================================================================================

We support INVICTUS and Help for Heroes





For more Informationfollow these links



Sunday, February 28, 2016

LFR 28th February - Number 799





We are registered with the GUILD OF ONE-NAME STUDIES
www.one-name.org

Welcome to the Laws Family Register. 

Are you are a member

Yes, then your membership renewal is probably overdue  

No, then we need you, just as much as you need us.

Email for an application today

registrar@lawsfamilyregister.org.uk 
================================================================

If you are a LAWS or a LAWES or have these surnames in your family or perhaps it sounds like this but in fact is spelt differently, we would love to hear from you, we need to extend and expand our knowledge of the families we have already discovered,

  Come and join us, theres no better time than now.

The LAWS FAMILY REGISTER 
is 
here to serve our members


We reach out to all, regardless of Race, Colour, Creed or National Origin, with support for researching family and documenting cultural inhertance

============================================================. =======

If you are interested in anyone listed here, email us with the name, date and reference number, and we will happily do a look up, you might even get a whole tree! 

Family Events for today 28 February

1718 - Birth: William LAWS-167376, Bristol Parish, VA British America
1747 - Marriage: Robert ADAMS-6511 and Mary (Mrs) LAWS-8035, Mayfair MDX UK
1759 - Marriage: Cuthbert LAWES-30688 and Isabel RICHARDSON-30689, Ryton DUR UK
1833 - Christen: Thomas LAWS (Servant) -41285,
1842 - Marriage: Henry SEDGWICK-34337 and Selina LAWS-34336, Shoreditch MDX UK
1845 - Baptism: Elizabeth Master LAWS-31590, Great Yarmouth NFK UK

                                                    Great Yarmouth Norfolk UK

1846 - Death: Elizabeth LAWS-30028, Sutton Scotney HAM
1852 - Marriage: Henry ROGERS-27543 and Dinah Eleanor LAWS-27542, Ovington NBL UK
1854 - Marriage: William WALTON-47110 and Elizabeth LAWS-47109,
1861 - Birth: James Milton LAWS (Farmer) -41184, Jewett, Cumberland Co IL USA
1866 - Marriage: Ebin Taylor LAWS-31996 and Emma Dallas MARK-31997, Fauquier VA USA
1871 - Marriage: Charles Vincent LAWS-43742 and Mary ANN MCGARREY-43743, Liverpool,              NSW AUSTRALIA
1876 - Baptism: Matthew LAWS (Scholar) -3812, Bedlington NBL UK
1882 - Death: Thomas LAWES (Farmer 66 acres) 1389, Tilshead WIL UK
1884 - Marriage: Geoffrey Cecil Twisleton Wykeham FIENNES-58762 and Marion Ruperta K                      Murray LAWES-58758, St Mark, North Aud;ey Street, St GHS MDX (RD)
1884 - Will Proved: Robert LAWES (Servant) -1260,
1896 - Marriage: Thomas Henry LAWS-37665 and Rosa Ella HEWETT-37666, Mt Vernon,                        Franklin Co TX USA
1896 - Death: Luella LAWS-32004, Warrenton VA USA
1896 - Death: Louisa  LAWES (Imbecile at birth)-1614, Homington WIL (St Michaels) UK
1899 - Birth: Pamela LAWS-119467, Derby DBY UK
1907 - Birth: Ernest Arthur LAWS-116071, Onehouse SFK UK
1908 - Birth: Robert Curtis LAWS-54508, Ashington NBL UK
1908 - Birth: Reginald Frederick Earle LAWS-50634,
1916 - Birth: Sidney Miller LAWS (Dock Worker) -50485, Kingston Upon Hull ERY UK

                                        Kingston Upon Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire UK

1917 - Birth: Alice LAWS-119202, Westminster MDX UK
1917 - Birth: Bertie Windsor LAWS-114988,
1918 - Death: Barrington Thomas LAWES (ARMY Private G/22441) -1060, Treviso, Veneto,                       ITALY
1920 - Death: John Simms LAWS-56184, Clarksburg Carroll TN UK
1926 - Burial: Mary Ann Rowell ELL (Drapers Assistant) -7698, Efford DEV UK
           (My Grt Grandmother)
1931 - Death: William James LAWES-2459, Brislington GLS UK
1934 - Admon: Herbert LAWS-117265,
1938 - Death: Annie LAWES-45398, Brooke Twp., Lambton County, ONT CANADA
1941 - Will Proved: George William LAWS (Electrical Apprentice) -39126,
1941 - Miscellaneous: Evelyn Mary LAWS-39121,
1943 - Marriage: John Robert LAWS -7648 and Margaret Dorethy MOONEY-                    7650,                  Whinchmore Hill MDX UK
           (My Parents)
1944 - Residence: Alfred Harry LAWS-57507, Fulham MDX UK
1944 - Death: Jacqueline J  LAWS (Civilian War Dead)-45096, Fulham MDX UK
1945 - Miscellaneous: Edward James LAWS (ARMY L/Cpl 2061525 REME) -121046,
1953 - Marriage: Duane Marvin LAWS (Cert. marriage counselor Mich/ Educator) -39231 and
           Jo Ann MITCHELL-39232,
1955 - Birth: Michael James LAWS-118605,
1957 - Burial: Charles O LAWS (PFC US Army) -37913, Beverley NJ USA
1964 - Birth: Matthew Thurlow LAWS-124489,
1971 - Birth: Tanya Marie LAWS-44056, Kings Lynn NFK UK

                                           Kings Lynn on the river Great Ouse, Norfolk UK

1976 - Burial: Jean LAWS-35230, Sydney NSW UK
1987 - Birth: Heather Maree LAWS-54310, Sydney NSW AUSTRALIA
1993 - Death: Rose Myrtle LAWS-48729,
1996 - Death: Evelyn LAWS-125113,
1997 - Death: Sylvia Sadler LAWS-167734, Newcastle upon Tyne NBL UK
1997 - Death: Norman Ian LAWS-125123, Gateshead DUR UK
1998 - Burial: Victor LAWS-110667, Stockton-On-Tees DUR UK
2006 - Death: Tobie LAWS-34080, St Clair IL USA

MISC
1806 - Death: Elizabeth PEARSON-34167, Feltwell NFK UK
1814 - Baptism: John Summers WOODFORD-24419, Iwerne Courtney DOR
1846 - Birth: Jane A MARQUESS-5815, Hamsterley DUR UK
1849 - Birth: Charles Winthrop BLISS-55333, Northampton MS USA


To benefit from
 our full database
You should join us today


To Apply for an account
 Just send an email to 

 registrar@lawsfamilyregister.org.uk
=========================================
A Child of the Twenties

A suburban childhood of the Twenties 

seen from the Ninteen Nineties

by John Robert Laws 1921-2008
Part 2.




The cat which had used the table leg as a scratching post was known by the unlikely name of Ma. It appears that I christened it with the only word in my vocabulary at a very early age. It was an undistingushed tabby which would catch the occasional unwary mouse but would spend more time snoozing in front of the fire. It seemed that every house had mice at that time. Food was more acccessible before fridges and freezers.

The kitchen was decorated in the deco of the period. The matchboarding of the lower part of the walls was painted a light brown like the dresser, and the upper walls were done in a strong cream gloss. I'm ptretty sure there were lace curtains the same as the rest of the house. Just a touch of an earlier period was the fringe to the mantle piece where the tea caddy (an ornamental tin), the candlesticks and the spill jar stood. The fire guard had a nice brass rim at the top, well polished by the constant touching of handsand glistened from the fire and the gaslight. Behind it was the black kitchen range, a solid fuel stove with two ovens and a back boiler for hot water. Much of the cooking was done on it in the winterusing heavy old iron cooking pots which must have been heirlooms. It the only heating in the house till late afternoon unless the bedroom gas fires were used to dress by. The kitchen stove was lit at six in the morning  normally by Lottie, though I remember my dad doing it on one occasion  with me looking on. Everyone else must have been out of action I reckon.

The scullery next to the kitchen saved the yellowish shallow sink and the black iron gas cooker with its brass taps from spoiling the kitchen. It was definately a workplace. the built-in copper had a fire below it to boil the wash. the mangle was enormous with big wooden rollers to get the water out  before and after rinsing. the corrugated washboard had not yet been passed on to the skiffle group. Clothing must have been tough to withstand the battering. It all had to be ironed of course which was done on the kitchen table on the ironing cloth conveniently kept in its end drawer. Two heavy flat-irons were used one in use while the other was reheated on the gas cooker. No thermostats on these, a drop of spit on the finger applied to the hot iron would tell whether the sizzle was about right.

The one convenience, so to speak, about the scullery was the downstairs loo was entered from it. At that time they were normally out in the garden waiting for the first hard frost to put them out of action. Indeed so were most of those of the houses built in the larer building boom of the early thirties.

There was one other work area, the coal cellar, prohibited to the infant population. This too was better than the thirties houses which had coal bunkers in the garden from which the fuel must be fetched come rain snow or shine. The descent to the  cellar through a door in the hall passage was steep to go down and perhaps steeper to climb up laden with a bucket of coal, so some may dispute my feeling that it was better than going out in the rain.

The coal came into the cellar through the coal hole in the top front step which was recessed into the house to give a small porch with the iron cover of the coal hole in the centre. Four of five sandstone steps led up from street level and the coalman would carry his enormous sack up  and upend it over the hole. Needless to say, this spouiled the pristine cleanliness of the whitened step and was not a popular event. Personally I liked to see the patient carthorse observing the proceedings while digging into his nosebag and enjoying the enforced rest. Having delivered his orders, the coal man would patrol the streets calling 'Coal' at intervals in the hope of casual customers. Much the same perhaps  as the 'butanero' delivering gas in today's Spain, though he needs no call, the clatter of his lorry enough to rouse the customers.

As well as the coal store there was plenty of space in the cellar with a sort of second room into which a feeble light filtered bt a small window below the 'front room' bay. I remember it as a junk store but maybe it was just things one couldn't throw away. Perhaps the most valuable tning in the cellar was the cold tap which didn't freeze even in the coldest snap when everybodies pipes were frozen and standpipes had to be put up in the streets.


As well as the coal store there was plenty of space in the cellar with a sort of second room into which a feeble light filtered bt a small window below the 'front room' bay. I remember it as a junk store but maybe it was just things one couldn't throw away. Perhaps the most valuable tning in the cellar was the cold tap which didn't freeze even in the coldest snap when everybodies pipes were frozen and standpipes had to be put up in the streets.

If the cellar was inelegant, the other rooms were much better. After the kitchen, the  most used room for living was the 'front room' often called the dining room. today it would be called the living room but room usage in middle class houses was different then, mainly due to the lack of central heating. In cold weather a fire would be lit in the front room in the late afternoon on weekdays or well before lunch on weekends. Its heat output could only be controlled  by stoking it up or letting it burn down with a little bit of draught control at the front and the alternatives of feeding it with lumps or slack.

The tiled fireplaces of the thirties and forties had not arrived, the fire was ornamented with tiled inserts on either side, enclosed by an iron surround. Above it the overmantle enclosed a big mirror and supported a heavy green onyx clock in a Palladium style  with a gilt dial and ormolu mounts. If this were not enough, it was flanked by a pair of blue-brown Doulton glazed vases which served as spill holders.

It all belonged to a rather earlier age, even at that time, the product of a rather late marriage before WWI of a couple raised in late Victorian times. Furniture was good and solid, even a dining chair took a bit of lifting, but there was no fear of it wearing out or falling apart and the room was big enough to hold a lot of it. As it was really a living room rather than a dining room, the fire had a large overstuffed armchair on either side and there was a matching sofa along the opposite wall. One recess beside the chimney breast was occupied by a tall glazed mahogany bookcase and the other held a dropfront coal scuttle which provided a little table top beside the chair. An enormous mahogany sideboard sat against the wall opposite the window, the back of its tall overmantle filled by a mirror. tapered square columns supported the tester style top on which stood a reproduction bronze statue of an athete. I suppose the original statue must be greek but although some thirty years or so later I spotted a full size replica in a public park in Liege, I remain in ignorance.

Ornaments abounded and on the sideboard were an epergne for fruit and flowers and a couple of silver plate and glass urns which never contained anything. More useful was the plated silver stand to hold the soda syphon  and the plated vegetable dishes sitting on the long lacey cloth. 'Cleaning the plate' was a regular chore and but one of many labour intensive housekeeping of those days. There was of course a heavy mahogany dining table and half a dozen chairs for the main purpose of the room. Apart from mealtimes, a dark crimson chenille tablecoth with a fancy fringe all round covered the table and in the middle stood another epergne, plated and just for flowers this time. Last but not least the obligatory aspidestra sat in a magnificent state of growth on an ornately carved ebony stand in the window bay, its pot enclosed by a handsome china jardinaire of deep blue and white. from this window at dusk the lamplighter could be seen on his rounds lighting the gas street lights one by one with a long pole he carried over his shoulder.  


To be continued tomorrow

===================================================================
We support the 'Dear Myrtle' G+ Community
==============================================
The content provided on this site is not guaranteed to be error free - It is always advised that you consult original records.


Member of The Guild of One-Name Studies

"This organization recognizes the United Nations' International Decade for People of African Descent 2015-2024. We reach out to all regardless of race, color, creed or national origin with support for researching family and documenting cultural inheritance.”

With grateful thanks to Simon Knott for permission to reproduce his photographs on this site see :-http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/
================================================================================================================================================

We support INVICTUS and Help for Heroes





For more Informationfollow these links

Saturday, February 27, 2016

LFR 27 February 2016 Number 798







We are registered with the GUILD OF ONE-NAME STUDIES
www.one-name.org

Welcome to the Laws Family Register. 

Are you are a member

Yes, then your membership renewal is probably overdue  

No, then we need you, just as much as you need us.

Email for an application today

registrar@lawsfamilyregister.org.uk 
================================================================

If you are a LAWS or a LAWES or have these surnames in your family or perhaps it sounds like this but in fact is spelt differently, we would love to hear from you, we need to extend and expand our knowledge of the families we have already discovered,

  Come and join us, theres no better time than now.

The LAWS FAMILY REGISTER 
is 
here to serve our members


We reach out to all, regardless of Race, Colour, Creed or National Origin, with support for researching family and documenting cultural inhertance

============================================================. =======

If you are interested in anyone listed here, email us with the name, date and reference number, and we will happily do a look up, you might even get a whole tree! 

Family Events for today 27 February


1745 - Birth: John LAWS-34210, Lakenheath NFK UK
1745 - Christen: Mary LAWS-4215, Stoke Dameral DEV UK
1806 - Marriage: Panta LAWS-48521 and Mary MOORE-48522,
1827 - Death: Robert LAWS-116934, Newburn on Tyne NBL UK
1841 - Marriage: Thomas GREEN (Ag Lab) -55842 and Mary LAWS-55841, Layer de la Haye ESS            (St John the Baptist)
1868 - Marriage: Alexander LAWS-124340 and Sarah Ann WATSON-3166, Stockton-On-Tees                    DUR UK
1874 - Birth: Blanche Edith LAWS-7470, Battersea SRY UK
1875 - Birth: John William LAWS (Driver) -9379, Newcastle upon Tyne NBL UK

                                                       Newcastle Upon Tyne NBL UK

1882 - Birth: Annie Mary LAWS-55272, North Farm, Houghton and Close House Twnp NBL UK
1887 - Marriage: Albert Charles NOKES (Pianoforte Maker) -121317 and Harriett LAWS-35569,                Hoxton MDX UK
1890 - Will Proved: Mary LAWES-18869,
1894 - Death: Joseph (Miner / Unmarried) LAWS-7798, Wingate DUR UK
1899 - Death: George Dewey LAWS-45947, Burkett, Coleman Co TX USA
1902 - Residence: Elizabeth Emma  LAWS (Widow of Independant Means)-109027, Hove SSX UK
1911 - Death: David C LAWS (Retired Bookeeper) -48174, St.Louis MO USA
1915 - Birth: Ada May LAWS-119157,
1915 - Miscellaneous: William Edward LAWS (Railway Signalman) -5987,
1915 - Will  Dated: Samuel LAWS (Railway Signalman)-5986,
1917 - Enlistment: George Henry LAWS (ARMY Cpl  12305) -54436, Durban SOUTH AFRICA
1918 - Birth: Charles LAWS-118623,
1920 - Birth: Gerald Joseph LAWS-46059, South Yarra, Melbourne VIC AUS
1928 - Birth: Thomas LAWS-118765,
1929 - Birth: Margaret E M LAWS-115210,
1931 - Burial: Henderson  LAWS- PVT US Army) 37987, Leavenworth National Cemetery Kansas              (Plot: 36, R8/15)
1941 - Death: Percy Jack LAWS (Civilian War Dead) -117254, Yate  & Burial Sodbury GLS UK
1948 - Birth: Kenneth Martin LAWES-47054,
1952 - Birth: Barbara Ann LAWS-45615, Price UT USA
1957 - Birth: Nigel LAWES-55526, Folkestone KEN UK
1958 - Miscellaneous: George LAWS (Local Government Officer) -121985,
1958 - Miscellaneous: Ada Elizabeth LAWS (Spinster) -58688,
1958 - Birth: Donald Ray LAWS-40404, TX USA
1959 - Admon: Duncan Willoughby LAWS-120801,
1959 - Birth: David H J  LAWS (Company Director) -46360,
1962 - Birth: Kym Frances LAWS-44051, Andover HAM UK
1963 - Death: Sybil Florence Lucy LAWES-117103,
1966 - Death: Henry John LAWES-123579, Weston Super Mare SOM UK
1966 - Death: May Louisa LAWS-123189, Holloway MDX UK
1967 - Birth: Brenda Gail LAWS-40489, TX USA
1979 - Death: Margaret Anne LAWES-46021, Grand Forks, BC CANADA
1989 - Birth: Colton Dean LAWS-29692, TX USA
1990 - Death: David B LAWS-42489,
2007 - Cremation: Muriel May LAWS (Widow) -50444, Westerleigh GLS UK
2015 - Miscellaneous: Basil LAWES-167311,

MISC
1693 - Will Proved: Leonard MATON-30962,
1838 - Burial: William CHARTERS (Farmer) -34624,
1857 - Death: Agnes Cant GORDON-117056,
1897 - Death: Dorethy Ann OLIVER-4113, Durham DUR UK
1914 - Birth: James FERGUSON-53257, Silksworth DUR UK
1921 - Death: Martha E WYNN-119052, Ohio Co KY USA
1936 - Burial: Mabel Gertrude COLLINS-7687, Talbot, Bournemouth DOR (St Mark)
1961 - Death: Harry REED-2802, Aylesham NFK UK
1964 - Birth: David COCKS-47047, Basingstoke HAM UK
1983 - Death: Sarah Helena May LEACH-30149,

To discover our full database 

You should join us today


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A Child of the Twenties

A suburban childhood of the Twenties 

seen from the Ninteen Nineties

by my late father John Robert Laws 1921-2008

Holidays 1,


Holidays at that time meant the seaside, and the seaside meant the East Coast, Sunshine, East winds sand and icy grey sea.

June was the preferred month, until school became important enough to interfere. My mother packed vast quantities of clothing in a big cabin trunk, which must have gone on ahead; it certainly didn’t come in the car with us. It took a good three hours to cover seventy odd miles to the coast. 

Bypass was an almost unknown word and certainly wasn’t applicable to even the Essex county town of Colchester the first time of two that we went that way. One was built in the next couple of years but now some sixty odd years later has been virtually absorbed into the town to be replace by the (now hardly adequate) A12.

We went to Clacton on the first holiday I remember and the sand and the seafront were the attractions. The next year it was Little Holland (Now Holland on Sea) where there was more sand and no seafront and I spent the whole holiday on the beach. After that it was always Walton on the Naze. 


Here we would have some rooms or latterly a house and we would stay for a month, though my father had only a fortnight of holiday and was only with us at weekends the rest of the time. We used to have a beach hut near the pier and would swim in the icy North Sea in blazing sunshine. It must have been here that I learnt to swim, taught by my mother, tuition later reinforced and widened by lessons at school. 

There was a stone-built breakwater in front of the beach huts and with the run of the tide along the coast there was deep water on one side and sand at the water’s edge on the other.  Facing the deep side was a platform diving board and a springboard where one could display a considerable lack of skill combined with great enjoyment.

The deep water was only there at high tide of course and so the tides controlled the way the day was spent. In the youngest bucket and spade days low water was in demand but once I could swim strongly it had to be high tide. Not far from the diving boards, rafts were anchored to give a point to swim to and even sit on, The young cannot sit still however and so it was climb out and dive back in again and swim back to base to start again.

It was never crowded at Walton. Holidaymakers were squeezed off most of the beaches at high tide but there were soon big stretches of smooth virgin sand again and on one of these a beach artist would claim a large pitch well overlooked from the promenade.    He would draw his pictures on the hard damp sand and set his hat to catch the pennies thrown from the prom. Perhaps he doubled as a pavement artist in the winter. 

The un-crowded beaches were ideal for flying kites and even permitted the continuous swinging of a tethered tennis ball hung on long elastic between a pair of poles. On one holiday I remember a less space consuming toy was rampant, the yoyo, and these spinning discs on strings were in every hand rising and falling, spinning and circling to show off the skill of the owner.

South of the pier was the sunniest part of the cliffs and here and there, were tiers of beach huts rising behind the prom from which one could watch the world go by or change for a swim. The beach hut was not only for swimming from but also for sitting in the sun sheltered from the east coast wind, very rarely for sheltering from rain, and for making tea and eating snacks and ice cream. 

I was much better at eating than the sitting but would sometimes stay and watch the sailing barges gliding serenely along the coast, their big red sails filled with the east wind. It was not so funny for them when it really blew hard. Distress flares would go up with a noisy boom and the lifeboat went out from its anchorage by the end of the pier. Even in the summer of holiday time this was not all that unusual.


                                         As well as sailing barges there were paddle steamers which called at the end of the pier. These came from Tower Bridge by way of Southend on Sea, and then sailed away into the far distance north to unknown Yarmouth perhaps. These were best watched from the end of the pier itself where the bump could be felt as ropes were thrown and contact made with the big paddle wheels churning in reverse. On the pier too there was entertainment. The man who rode a bike off the high diving board was always worth watching, but the children’s concerts were pretty corny, even for kids.

To be continued tomorrow



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With grateful thanks to Simon Knott for permission to reproduce his photographs on this site see :-http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/
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