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Tuesday, March 31, 2015

LAWS FAMILY REGISTER MAR 2015 Number 471




Welcome to the Laws Family Register. 

================================================================

A Child of the Twenties

A suburban childhood of the Twenties 

seen from the Ninteen Nineties


by John Robert Laws 1921-2008

Part 8.

PEOPLE


In the High Street there were those who offered oddments from doorways, matches and lemons spring to mind. Along the gutters the sandwich board men, walked, enclosed in their advertising matter or calls to repentance, sometimes singly sometimes in threes or fours in a straggling crocodile. Occasionally there was an organ grinder on the corner of a side street, winding his handle and his mechanical music would add to the general street noise. There is an impression of noisiness in the High Street. Apart from the street traders there were trams clattering on their steel rails, horses were iron shod and so were the wheels of most of the carts. Lorries vans and cars were less well silenced and there was even the occasional Steam traction engine. However there were no motor scooters and the few motorbikes did not roar around.  

One faint memory of Green Lanes is of the buses with their cabs shrouded in wire netting to protect the volunteer drivers during the National Strike of 1926. What a good job there were no television cameras to encourage the attackers.

As well as the main shopping area in Green Lanes there were a few little shops around the railway station. The sweet shop was to me the most important and in those impecunious days many sweet shops kept a halfpenny and farthing box with a selection of sweets at those prices for kids with pocket money. It is a sign of of changing times that as I type this computer throws out the word Farthing as not being in the dictionary.

The dress of the period is familiar from photographs but the black and white of these photos does not tell us how much to colours changed. These monochrome photos are perhaps appropriate to the rather drab colours of every day wear. Grey, black and white were definitely favourites except for special occasions. Green was thought unlucky by some though my mother had a brilliant green evening dress for one special occasion. Red tended to be associated with the immoral so one was left with brown and blue and usually dark at that. Even holiday wear was much less colourful, white flannels and a navy blue blazer being about the height of seaside fashion for Pater families. The ladies did much better with flower patterned fabrics. For better or for worse the mini skirt hadn't been invented and bikini was still the name of an unknown Pacific island.

Among the street people with distinctive dress the policeman stood out. A big man in his navy blue tunic and trousers, a leather belt around his middle with a bull’s-eye torch at the rear and his outfit completed with a proper Bobbies helmet on his head and big black boots on his feet for pavement pounding. Just occasionally his whistle might be heard shrilling as he chased some malefactor down the road. More often he was seen but not heard as he came by on foot or on his bike with his rain cape neatly folded over the handlebars.

Our family doctor lived just across the way in a sizable corner house. I saw him from time to time when I had various childhood ailments but his likeness escapes me. My mother always thought me thin and needing fattening up but rather doubting when the doctor included pork in his dietary recommendations. Anyway I ate like a horse the only dislike I can remember was the kidney in steak and kidney pudding. The doctor had installed a machine for 'sun-ray treatment' and my mother took me over to him several times for a dose of the beneficial light. It was some sort of ultra violet light emission which would no frighten a quack silly today but in small doses probably did neither good or harm.       

INOVATION
The twenties and early thirties were a period of innovation in the home. Discoveries made in earlier decades started to come to fruition as household hardware, consumer durables stated to flow into the home. It was only the first wave of course; the flood was released after the war onto the earlier infrastructure.
The first innovation in my world was the gramophone which ousted the piano-player largely on account of size I suspect as the reproduction from the brittle single sided records was less than good. We must have missed a couple of stages in this development as I did not see a cylinder  playing phonograph until  friend produced one from a junkshop a year or two later. Nor do I remember a Gramophone with a big horn on top. Ours had the horn hidden away in its polished woodwork and the only music from it which struck a chord in my memory was Toseelli’s Seranade.
The radio seems to have come at the same time as the gramophone not true of course, but a childhood impression. The crystal set was impressive hardware then even if the output that came through the earphones all the way from Daventry was erratic and to me uninteresting , Fiddling with the ‘cats whisker’ to try and coax  the best reception from the as of yet untamed crystal was much more to my taste.
The crystal set was not with us long; Soon battery powered sets with varying numbers of mysterious glowing thermionic valves took over with better reception and more to go wrong. Aerial poles sprouted at the foot of most gardens, harbingers of the later ugly skyline rash. Two batteries were needed to work these sets, a large HT battery which just wore out and had to be replaced and a lead acid accumulator which had to be recharged at the shop down the road, all this power made the use of a loudspeaker possible. It stood on top of the cabinet housing all the bits and its curly metal horn was now really audible.
For me change began with the coming of electric light, just the tip of the innovation iceberg as the electric supply network built up. In with the electric light came the electric points as we called the outlets, only one in a room to start with  just for a reading lamp perhaps. The radio, which we called the wireless with a wry smile, it had more wires than any other previous domestic item, was now released from the tyranny of the accumulator as mains powered sets arrived. The voice from the trumpet of your loud speaker no longer started to fade as the battery power ran down. It is odd to think that a considerably later innovation the replacement of the valve by the transistor, brought back the rechargeable battery but in a small and convenient form.
With the plugging in of the new radios the electric supply had started on its trail of removing chores from the household. The next arrival after the radio was the electric fire which rapidly penetrated into every home with electric supply and brought quick warmth. More flexible than the older gas fire was, it was even more useful before central heating became commonplace.
Following it up the front steps came the vacuum cleaner salesman, the first and probable the greatest beneficiary of the small electric motor in the domestic field, except the housewife of course. No longer were the clouds of dust raised as the bass broom worked its way down the stairs and through the hall to the back door. The volume of dirt in the house was reduced but the battle could not be won until the open coal fire was on the way out.
Somehow progress was slow with the electric cooker which did not really become controllable until my childhood was well into double figures. Gas and solid fuel cookers continued to spread dirt in the home but were the easiest and cheapest stoves to use and even now hold material portion of the market.
The only other innovation to compare with electricity was the motor vehicle. It had been invented some thirty odd years before, but development and cost reduction took time, and I was about four years old when my father bought his first car, a bull nosed Morris, built like a tank but a troublesome beast. It was 1925 and there were not a lot of cars on the road, the speed limit was 20 mph and although this lasted very little longer my dad managed to get fined for exceeding it before it was changed. Houses had no garages, and the car was housed about half a mile away where a garage proprietor had a few lockup garages besides his scruffy workshop. The Morris was only used at weekends and holidays and although it was a lovely toy for my dad I thought it a bit of a bore and escaped from it as soon as I was old enough to ride a bike on the road.
Perhaps the most innovative thing about our car was that my mother learnt to drive it, scarcely the done thing at that time. By the time I was ten she had one of her own, a little open topped Singer which was far more to my taste and could be pushed up to 60mph “Don’t tell your father!” There road system was getting some improvement in the twenties and a few new roads space was left for a second carriageway, often it got left for another thirty years.
At some point my father changed his Morris for a Chrysler which went much father, too fast in fact to get round the Anglo-Saxon corners of East Anglia, where he wrote it off and landed himself in hospital for a day or two, seat belts were a much later innovation, after that he got a sedate Hillman which lasted the rest of his days.    

To be continued tomorrow

============================================================. =======

Family Events from our database for today March 31

1716 - Christen: Henry LAWS-34413, Padiham LAN UK
1784 - Will Proved: John CHARTERS-34578,
1812 - Birth: Elizabeth MCMINN-31595, Kirkcudbright KCD UK
1817 - Miscellaneous: John LAWES (Labourer) -38273,
1822 - Burial: Thomas LAWS-31973, Portsea HAM UK
                                         Nelson's flagship 'Victory' in Portsea Naval Dockyard

1825 - Birth: George LAWS (RN 48648 A B Pensioner) -8135, Portsea HAM UK
1829 - Baptism: William LAWES (Ag Lab)-170, Ellingham HAM UK
1839 - Baptism: Mary LAWS-3151, Wareham DOR UK
1855 - Birth: Jennie Ann JOHNSON-34172, Kaneville, Pottawattamie IA (Council Bluffs)
1857 - Burial: James Thomas LAWS-51822, Stoke Newington MDX UK
1857 - Burial: Agnes T LAFFERTY-35418, Rookwood NSW Australia (C of E Cemetery)
1861 - Burial: James LAWS (Reverend) -4686, Cincinnati OH USA
1863 - Birth: Albert Fisher LAWS-29647,
1866 - Miscellaneous: Thomas Edward Laws MOORE (Navy Captain) -38745,
1866 - Burial: Alfred LAWS (Coachmakers Apprentice) -3154, Wareham DOR UK
1877 - Birth: Charles Adolph LAWS-41009, NV USA
1879 - Death: William LAWS-7952, Middlesborough NRY UK
1883 - Birth: Earl Grant LAWS-31730, Boulder CO USA
1892 - Death: Elsie Barbara LAWS-42845, Shillingstone DOR UK
1899 - Birth: Hilda Maud LAWES-118587,
1902 - Birth: Thomas Brignell LAWS (RN CPO Stoker K58535 DSM 1945) , Brighton SSX UK
                                                                    Brighton Sussex

1908 - Death: Catherine STUART-41898, NBL UK
1909 - Birth: Rose BRAILSFORD-125393, Paddington MDX UK
1909 - Marriage: Zenos Marvin LAWS (Section Hand - Steam Railroad) -34173 and Mary Luella                  ROWLEY-45623, Diaz, Galeana, Chihuahua MEXICO
1909 - Enlistment: George LAWS (ARMY Private ) -54343,
1913 - Birth: Robert S LAWS-52521,
1918 - Death: R LAWS (ARMY Private 18444) -45122,
1919 - Birth: Victor James LAWS-35291, Martin Street, Rookwood (Lidcombe) NSW Australia
1928 - Birth: James M LAWS-42284,
1931 - Will Proved: William James LAWES-2459,
1932 - Birth: John Maurice LAWS-54822,
1934 - Death: Martha LAWS-122241, Poolville, Parker Co TX
1937 - Miscellaneous: Henrietta Lucy COLBY-36352,
1937 - Admon: Lewis Alfred LAWS (Electrical engineer) -3659,
1943 - Death: George LAWS (Innkeeper) -122920, Witham ESS UK
1943 - Death: Benjamin Elijah LAWS (Retired Boat Builder) -7972, Berkhampsted HRT UK
1943 - Burial: William James LAWS-3892, Talbot, Bournemouth DOR (St Mark) UK
1944 - Marriage: Harold Wilbert LAWS (Farmer)  & Margaret Pricilla MCNAUGHT- (Nurse)
1944 - Military: A D LAWES (RAAF F/Sgt 1629171 10 Sqdn) -115976,
1945 - Death: Eva Lavon STREADBECK-39230, Provo UT USA
1948 - Residence: Edward Henry LAWS (Hall Porter) -5458, Dollis Hill MDX UK
1949 - Burial: Collins L LAWS (Military?) -38370, Park Grove Cemetery, Broken Arrow, Tulsa OK
1949 - Birth: Joan Louise LAWS-37606,
1953 - Death: Ottis LAWS-42455,
1953 - Death: Cecil O LAWS-41456, Rockcastle Co KY USA
1957 - Death: Agnes Elizabeth LAWS-121945, Ranwick NSW AUSTRALIA
1962 - Birth: David CUTTEN-43664, 70 Gonville Crescent, Stevenage HRT UK
1963 - Death: Frederick William HOCKNELL (French Polisher) -46078, Edmonton MDX UK
1964 - Birth: Martin Anthony LAWS  (Dr Mech CAM) -3263, Chatham KEN UK
1965 - Miscellaneous: Doris Edith LAWS-58198,
1979 - Marriage: William Frank LAWS-30124 and Jennifer O'REILLY-125574,
1985 - Birth: Justin Durell LAWS-40741, TX UK
2005 - Death: William T LAWS-42572, Valdese General Hospital, Granite Falls NC USA


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12,805 Families
104,184 Events 
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With grateful thanks to Simon Knott for permission to reproduce his photographs on this site see :-http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/

Monday, March 30, 2015

LAWS FAMILY REGISTER Mar 2015 Number 470




Welcome to the Laws Family Register. 

================================================================


A Child of the Twenties

A suburban childhood of the Twenties 

seen from the Ninteen Nineties


by John Robert Laws 1921-2008

Part 7

PEOPLE


Until school age there was not a lot of contact with adults outside the family. One saw the neighbour in their gardens from time to time but it was not till a little later that a family came next door with whom we became friendly. The Kemble’s had five offspring, five daughters for starters the youngest in her late teens, and a son harry a bit older than myself with whom I became quite friendly. For some years we were regular cycling companions.

The tradesmen were the people who are impressed on my memory. Delivery was order of the day despite shopping on an almost daily basis. The milkman had an open backed float with churns in it and would dip the milk out with a long handled measure into your jug. It was not long till he graduated to a horse and cart with four wheels and milk in glass bottles with cardboard tops but in very hot weather, despite two deliveries a day, you still had to boil the milk soon after delivery before it went off. My mother used to tell me that when she lived in Devon as a child they had their own cow and that after milking she would separate the cream which she loved and churn the butter. That was all gone for town dwellers of course, but in the grocers shop the butter would still be scooped up and patted into shape instead of arriving in oblong paper packets.

The grocer delivered as well and his man would arrive at the door step and jog the memory with a verbal list of commodities delivered in a rapid fire voice rather like a market auctioneer."Salt - Pepper - Vinegar-Mustard" he would fire away and then take up his list at the same point after he had been interrupted with an item. The baker's man pulled a two wheeled handcart with a rounded top and a leg at the back so that it didn't tip up when he let go. He would delve into this for the loaf you wanted, warm and crusty and certainly not wrapped or sliced! The postman was distinctive in his blue uniform with red piping and his odd little flat hat, almost a helmet. He did not bring a load of junk mail for the dustman to take away again, and what he delivered today had been posted yesterday except from foreign parts.

It is odd to have no memory of a butcher delivering at that time, perhaps my mother preferred to select our meat in the shop. There were certainly butchers boys to be seen on their delivery bicycles with a basket on the front, whistling their way around the streets. Later, in the thirties we had a butcher who would call early and then would come back with the meat in time for lunch. Going by the name of Sam Collins he was a big beefy fellow with a perpetual grin who was everybody’s friend.

There were street traders in the twenties as throughout the ages. A muffin man came along the street at weekends ringing his handball with a cloth covering a tray of muffins and crumpets on his head. From time to time a knife grinder would come along with a grinding wheel attached to the front of his bicycle and worked in some mysterious way from the pedals. He called as he came, offering his services and out would come the women with their carvers and kitchen knives to sharpen. Most doorsteps were sandstone anyway so there were plenty who managed well without him.

In the High Street there were those who offered oddments from doorways, matches and lemons spring to mind. Along the gutters the sandwich board men, walked, enclosed in their advertising matter or calls to repentance, sometimes singly sometimes in threes or fours in a straggling crocodile. Occasionally there was an organ grinder on the corner of a side street, winding his handle and his mechanical music would add to the general street noise. There is an impression of noisiness in the High Street. Apart from the street traders there were trams clattering on their steel rails, horses were iron shod and so were the wheels of most of the carts. Lorries vans and cars were less well silenced and there was even the occasional Steam traction engine. However there were no motor scooters and the few motorbikes did not roar around.    



To be continued tomorrow

============================================================. =======

Family Events from our database for today March 30


1710 - Baptism: John LAWS-9249, Stepney MDX UK
                                                            St Dunstan's Stepney MDX

1735 - Marriage: Cuthbert LAWS-34945 and Elizabeth -34946, Bromfield CUL UK
1740 - Marriage: John KNIGHT-5711 and Margaret LAWS-5MILLER712, Weeting NFK (St Mary             & All Saints) UK
1805 - Baptism: John LAWS-41976, Gateshead DUR UK
1807 - Birth: Joseph COOK-44124, Lamesley DUR UK
1818 - Birth: Abner LAWS-119986,
1834 - Birth & Death: Israel LAWS-31012, Diss NFK
1849 - Birth: Demetrius Ypsilanti LAWS-48451, Pen Yan, Yates County NY USA
1851 - Death: Michael LAWS-37835,
1855 - Admon: Charles Sidney LAWS-123199,
1868 - Death: Eliza BOWDEN-56489, West Row, Mildenhall  SFK
1878 - Miscellaneous: William Witt LAWES (Publisher (Echo Newspaper) Gent -213,
1878 - Will Proved: James LAWES (Railway Stationmaster) -211,
1882 - Death: Arthur LAWS (Scholar) -9543,
1884 - Marriage: Henry HOTCHKISS-55182 and Amy Laura LAWS -54911, West Bromwich STS
1884 - Birth: Lizzie Eliza LAWS-57752, Lambeth SRY UK
1891 - Birth: David R LAWS-49198,
1892 - Birth: Clarence Stanley LAWS-119127, TN USA
1895 - Birth: Lucy Jane LAWS-54703, Molong NSW Australia
1895 - Birth: Abba Frances LAWS-41186, Lebo, Coffey Kansas USA
1897 - Will Proved: John LAWS (Chemist) -8420,
1898 - Birth: Marjorie Mabel LAWS-121288,
1898 - Death: Sarah LAWS (Widow) -8303, Coltishall NFK UK
1909 - Death: John LAWS-115064, Islington MDX UK
1916 - Burial: Robert John LAWS-119591, Wareham DOR UK
1925 - Death: George LAWS-6436, Felling DUR UK
1926 - Birth: Sheila Maria LAWS-43612, Kingston Upon Hull ERY UK
1927 - Birth: Edwin John LAWS-53943, Isle of Dogs MDX
1927 - Birth: Roy Allen LAWES-122335,
1927 - Birth: Joan Margaret LAWS-118742,
1927 - Birth: Edwin John LAWS-53943, Isle of Dogs MDX UK
1927 - Admon: Robert LAWS-8622,
1934 - Birth: Bettie Louisa LAWS-123876, Turnersburg NC USA
1940 - Birth: Arthur William LAWS (Company Director) -46483,
1944 - Miscellaneous: H LAWS (RAF Sergeant (Nav.) -45068,
1946 - Death: Harry Augustus Percy LAWES-45012, Carshalton SRY UK
1950 - Marriage: Cyril George BATT-43565 and Elizabeth CHARTERS (Nurse) -34608, Wingate              WRY UK
1950 - Marriage: James William LAWS-118962 and Awdrey Fay RIDDELL-118963, Burwood,                    NSW Australia
1954 - Birth: Brenda Gayle LAWS-40354, TX USA
1955 - Miscellaneous: Maggie Lavinia LAWS-43098,
1955 - Admon: David LAWS (Ag Lab) -4601,
1959 - Birth: Amanda Ann MOORE (Company Director) -46329,
1963 - Marriage: Peter Robin LAWES (Accountant) -59289 and Ann DAVIS-59183, Tunbridge                    Wells KEN UK
1963 - Marriage: William George BERRY (Toolmaker)-6303 and Pamela LAWS (Secretary) -6302,            Althorne ESS UK
1965 - Death: Horace Herbert LAWS-96376, Maidstone KEN UK
1965 - Death: Clement Parker LAWES (Ag Waggoner) -119231, Tilshead WIL UK
1965 - Death: Lucille L LAWS-42395,
1965 - Birth: Kara Lynn LAWS-40470, TX
1966 - Birth: Barbara LAWS (Company Director) -46470,
1967 - Burial: Anne Brigadia FRANCIS-30071, Dutton Park, Brisbane QLD
1972 - Death: Stanley Valentine LAWES-125452, Wellington NZ
1984 - Birth: Charles Emmit LAWS-40727, TX USA
2002 - Marriage: Denis P BREARLEY-117072 and Ann Olivia Chloe LAWS-116875, Salisbury                  WIL UK
2011 - Death: Brenda Mary JENNINGS-34599, Kingston Upon Hull ERY UK


To see
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41,999 People   
12,805 Families
104,184 Events 
in 20,194 Places

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 Germany 4530 - UK 2311 - France 1332
Russia 883 - Ukraine 628 - Turkey 339 - Australia 328 - Ireland 266 Canada 214


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Sunday, March 29, 2015

LAWS FAMILY REGISTER Mar 2015 Number 469


(before we start I'd like to apologise for errors yesterday)


Member of the Guild of One-Name Studies

Welcome to the Laws Family Register. 

================================================================

A Child of the Twenties

A suburban childhood of the Twenties 

seen from the Ninteen Nineties


by John Robert Laws 1921-2008

Part 6.

PEOPLE

There seemed to be a wider range of people then than there are now. There was no question or concept of equality. To me Mum was all important but to everyone Dad was 'The Boss'  and this nickname was used all the time between mother and her helper Lottie the maid. Lottie was a sort of auntie to me, having been part of the family longer than I had. This help was much needed by my mother not only on account of the houswork but because catastrophe had struck my parents when my sister Mary had suffered brain damage as a complication of meningitus. This happened at about the age of  threeafter which there was no further mental progress although she grew up physically but dumb.

Standards of living then were much lower then but in this respect we were fortunate, though everyone worked hard. It is my belief that most people were as happy then as now except where poverty and illness coincided. It is the presures of daily life that makes for unhappines and these were just different. In many ways it is the small comforts and conveniences that we would miss if we had to step back in time.

We did not have swarms of relations, the Victorian habit of enormous families had gone just in time. There were two maiden aunts, my fathers sisters, who lived together in the bottom part of a house off West Green Road. They worked in garment manufacture and their smallish rooms were cramed with too large furniture inheritated from my grandparents of the true Victorian era who I never knew. Some of it would be museum pieces now. There was a bed with a half tester rail over it and time to time they would occasionally come to tea on Sunday or to Christmas lunch. I remember a Christmas present of a little purse with two half-crowns in it, the old age pension was then just four of these coins, and although they were still working at that time, this was soon to be their weekly income.

My mother had just one sister, Alice who lived in Manchester, where her husband Jack was a lecturer in zoology. I only met him once, he had a nastly limp as a result of FRC service in WWI and he did not make old bones. Mother went and visited Alice after he had died and took me with her in her little car to help find thne way 172 miles according to the AA routewhich we followed. Alice had a nice house in a pleasant suburb but before long she returned to her roots in Devon and spent the rest of her years in Kingswear.

there was also my uncle Joe, really a cousin of my father though I think he had been brought up as a brother and was part of a trio of sailing enthusiasts with my dad and his younger brother Albert. The three of them used to go sailing in Devon and Cornwall and my father and Albert managed to aquire wives in the process. No doubt this put an end to the sailing but my father still liked to row and after he bought his first car in 1925 he would take me over to the river Lea on a Sunday morning and row from the boathouse at one lock up to the next lock and back. Being Sunday, the horse drawn barges were all at rest and the locks inactive. It was already partly industrial along the river , the canal really, but the marshes were open and flat , crossed by the long new concrete bridge of Lea Bridge Road which led on towards Epping Forest.  

Albert and his Cornish wife Louise were in Harbin, in the wilds of Manchuria  so we saw them very rarely, I only remember two occasions. A slow boat to China really was slow before the airlines and the Trans Siberian railway not a journey for the hurried or the timid though they went that way at least once.

Joe and his wife May  lived in a 1920's new semi in Palmers Green and were the relations we saw most. He was a keen gardener, which my father certainly wasn't but they were pretty good friends and Joe and May had Christmas lunch with us some yerars. To a child, Christmas was important of course and the old time way of feasting in the greatest abundance that funds permitted was still strong. there were no supermarkets and no domestic refrigerators of course but 'nouvelle cuisine'hadn't been heard of either. I do not think thatthere was asmuch obesity then as now, the ignorant did not have the means for it and most of the prosperous were working too hard to get fat. Beer was however proportionately cheaper a nd a few more men could be seen carrying the mark of it in their big bellies or red noses.

Untill school age there was not a lot of contact with adults outside the family. One saw the neighbours in their gardens from time to time but it was not till a little later that a family came next door whith whom we became friendly. The Kembles had five offspring, five daughters for starters the youngest in her late teens, and a son harry a bit older than myself with whom I became quite friendly. For some years we were regular cycling companions.


To be continued tomorrow

============================================================. =======

Family Events from our database for today March 29

1730 - Marriage: Edward LAWES-1644 and Xyian HUBBERT-1645, Norwich NFK UK
                                                              Norwich Cathedral

1749 - Birth: Thomasin WHEATLEY-117009, Lanchester DUR UK
1751 - Christen: George LAWES-331, Martin WIL UK
1770 - Baptism: William LAWES-122180, Tilshead WILTUK
                                                              Tilshead Wiltshire 

1799 - Death: Susan WIFFAM-5798, Feltwell NFK UK
                                                                Feltwell Norfolk

1808 - Baptism: Robert LAWES-2864, Felthorpe NFK UK
                                                        St Margarets Felthorpe Norfolk

1817 - Birth: Samuel LAWS (Innkeeper) -7940, Ditchingham NFK UK
1825 - Marriage: Richard POOR-8551 and Elizabeth LAWS-8550, London MDX (St GHS) UK
1850 - Death: Hannah LAWS-5409, Ditchingham NFK UK
1857 - Baptism: Mary Jane LAWES-43262, Coombe Bissett WIL (St Michaels)UK
                                                          Coombe Bissett Wiltshire

1859 - Will  Proved: John Milligen LAWS (Navy Rear Admiral)-3030, 
1861 - Burial: Hugh Willoughby LAWS-116948, Ovington NBL UK
1872 - Birth: Junius Eugene LAWS-41019, Kansas USA
1880 - Birth: Ida LAWS-124321, Jersey City Heights NJ USA
1883 - Marriage: Benjamin Taylor LAWS-7113 and Della O BANKSTON, Carroll Co TN USA
1884 - Death: William Gordon LAWS-117033, Prudhoe NBL UK
                                                 Prudhoe Castle Northumberland

1884 - Death: George  LAWS (Coal Miner)-47355, Westoe DUR UK
1893 - Birth: Frances DAVIES-44242, 
1896 - Death: Beatrice Maud LAWS-48788, Cowra QLD Australia
1902 - Birth: Vera Amy LAWS-3496, 
1904 - Birth: Harry Augustus LAWES-123793, Wallsend NBL UK
                                                 Wallsend Roman Fort, Northumberland

1906 - Birth: Phillip Saxelby LAWS-33451, 
1915 - Military: J W  LAWS (Army Captain)-41129, 
1915 - Will Proved: Georgiana LAWES (Spinster) -397, 
1917 - Death: William Frederick CLEGG (Clockmaker) -7565, Manchester LAN UK
1918 - Death: Ernest Alexander LAWES (Army Private 9710) -44979, 
1927 - Death: David R LAWS-49198, 
1928 - Death: Dudley G LAWS-41476, Boone Co KY USA
1939 - Miscellaneous: Frank James LAWES (Artist & Designer) -37010, 
1939 - Miscellaneous: Edgar James LAWES 
1940 - Miscellaneous: Charles Cecil LAWES (Farm Manager) -24406, 
1943 - Immigration: Hugh Douglas Willoughby LAWS (Merchant Navy) -38660, New York NY 
1943 - Miscellaneous: Frederick LAWS (Tutor) -122924, 
1943 - Will  Proved: Henry Donald LAWS (Joiner)-3171, 
1945 - Military: George Edward James LAWS (ARMY Sgt  2593116 ) -51907, BEM Medal
1950 - Death: Jane CHEAL-36322, Bexley Heath KEN UK
1952 - Marriage: Stanley Walter DORMER-43391 and Ivy Irene LAWS-43390, East Ham ESS UK
1952 - Birth: James Irvin LAWS-40326, TX
1957 - Marriage: Fentriss M LAWS-114874 and Doris L COOPER-114875, Clark NV USA
1957 - Marriage: Walter CLELLAND-42055 and Florence Alice BENT-41859, Barnet HRT UK
                                             Toll Gate Hadley Wood Road Barnet HRT

1963 - Death: Mary Belle LUNSFORD-31088, 
1966 - Death: Fred LAWS (PFC US Army) -37954, 
1969 - Death: Bertha N LAWS-41450, Jefferson Co KY USA
1973 - Birth: Dermont LAWS-40569, TX USA
1975 - Death: Doris ELLICK-35405, Erskineville NSW AUSTRALIA
1975 - Death: Norah Daphne QUIGLEY-35240, Erskineville NSW AUSTRALIA
1980 - Marriage: Michael Graeme LAWS-125290 and Kim WARRINGTON-125291, 
1982 - Birth: Melanie Patricia LAWS-55012, 
1982 - Birth: Travis LAWS-40693, TX USA
1982 - Birth: Sarah Elizabeth LAWS-40692, TX USA
1997 - Death: Kathleen Lutrelle DESENIS-115432, Aurora IN USA
2003 - Death: George LAWS-35221, Toukley, (formerly of Leumeah) NSW AUSTRALIA
2005 - Death: Hazel Mildred LAWS-122256, Mounds, Pulaski, IL USA
2005 - Burial: Thomas LAWS-57233, Rippleside Cemetery, Ripple Road, Barking ESS UK
2005 - Death: William L LAWS-42571, Orlando FL USA
2014 - Death: Albert Wayne LAWS-124895, Spartanburg SC USA


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With grateful thanks to Simon Knott for permission to reproduce his photographs on this site see :-http://www.norfolkchurches.co.uk/